Get answers from your peers along with millions of IT pros who visit Spiceworks.
Join Now

We have a big project coming - a corporate laptop upgrade (about USD 1.5 MIL).

We have test units deployed to users and they "work"  They are  Dell xps 13 units. Last time Dell switched the processors from a intel U to a Y and we noticed perfomance issues. Now i need to benchmark the new U processors.

What is the best way to compare side by side processing power, heat etc on laptops. How do you do it? 

**Lots of options on google, just curious what ya'll are doing **


Learn General Backup with this intermediate Article
This is the 31st article in the Spotlight on IT series. If you'd be interested in writing an article on the subject of backup, securit...
Helpdesk icon
Spiceworks Help Desk

The help desk software for IT. Free.

Track users' IT needs, easily, and with only the features you need.

9 Replies

· · ·
John Freeman
Cayenne
OP
John Freeman

Depends on the usage of the machines. Because we have a lot of heavy browser usage (seriously I've seen users with 20 tabs open) we used Peacekeeper but it's no longer available, I've been meaning to try IMacro as an alternative, heard it works well to test the browser and processor.

We use 7-Zip Benchmark for heat tests.

1
· · ·
Breffni Potter
Datil
OP
Breffni Potter

Dara IT is an IT service provider.

I'd look at user testing as well over a 30 day period. With different "units" of the business to garner feedback on the soft stuff. Proc speed, heat, all those will change after 6-9 months anyway. A guided user test process may be useful.

0
· · ·
CaptainBiscuit
Chipotle
OP
CaptainBiscuit

Pick a few power users and a few users you know to abuse machines (ie, 20 tabs at once with extra large spreadsheets) and give them test units. And maybe a technical person to run whatever benchmarking software suits your fancy.

Before buying, see if your local electronics hut has any of the models on display so you can fondle them and test for durability/weight/pretty lights.

1
· · ·
John3504
Tabasco
OP
John3504

The easiest way to compare processors that I know about is the cpuboss web site.

http://cpuboss.com/compare-cpus

1
· · ·
Steptoe Scrappie
Serrano
OP
Steptoe Scrappie

It might not be an option for you but when we do a device swap we get one test unit and send it out with a "real" user to test in the environment it will be used in.

We usually get it right but have had a few "extra" devices for IT to use that are not upto spec. Also if you have a good supplier they might be able to loan you one to use in a trial.

1
· · ·
barry c schechter
Sonora
OP
barry c schechter

I use 3rd party benchmark testing from labs or magazines with labs.  https://www.laptopmag.com/benchmarks for example.  If you have a corporate lab you could purchase on of each proposed model and use tools to do this yourself. I find that more time consuming and use the 3rd parties.

0
· · ·
Scott5043
Chipotle
OP
Scott5043

Know your use cases. Individuals running basic Office apps locally will have different needs than those primarily using Internet or client/server applications. Since you've settled on 13" screens, it should be safe to say no one is using CAD, Photoshop, or editing video.  Capacity and speed of other primary components (memory, disk, video, network) will have roles to play as well. 

Will everyone need a laptop? Does everyone prefer laptops? Would a tablet or desktop work better for certain individuals? What other accessories might be needed (monitors, full-size keyboards or numeric pads, mice, carry bags, extra power bricks, wifi adapters, etc.)

With something like 1,000 laptops to purchase, it's seems unlikely that one size will fit all. Some will need more processing power, while others might need more memory or disk capacity. Let the users demonstrate what they do, then test for yourself determine your own benchmarks for major case categories. That benchmark becomes the minimum standard. 

When purchasing, choose systems that exceed the needs for the foreseeable future, since upgrading can be expensive or very limited -- like the Surface Pro, but I digress... I like to plan to use the systems for the duration of the depreciation period, which is usually 5 years. Be sure to include warranty support and accidental damage where appropriate for that period as well.

..

0
· · ·
Jim6795
Jalapeno
OP
Jim6795

CaptainBiscuit wrote:

Pick a few power users and a few users you know to abuse machines (ie, 20 tabs at once with extra large spreadsheets) and give them test units. And maybe a technical person to run whatever benchmarking software suits your fancy.

^^ This! ^^

And whatever you do, try to avoid calling them "Guinea Pigs" to their faces!  :^D

0
· · ·
Gingerw00ki3
Sonora
OP
Gingerw00ki3

Don't bother with the newer XPS's... they're still shit for an enterprise environment... on paper, a new decked out XPS 15 2 in 1 should smoke my 7573 2 in 1... but because of the issues with them... my real world tasks get performed much faster (Adobe CC stuff)... AND I can upgrade my ram if I so choose to ;)

0
Oops, something's wrong below.